Thirteen Fundamental Truths

Back in 1986 I documented a list of 13 fundamental truths that applied to all organizations. I ran across these statements recently when I was looking for some comments made by a past IBM president that I wanted to use in a new book I am writing. As I thought back over the past 25 years, I realized that Continue reading

Uneasy But Useful Allies

There’s so much information in the world today that letting people re-create their own databases is a luxury we can’t afford. If we were all allowed to create our own basic concepts without any standardization, we couldn’t effectively interact with each other. Imagine trying to communicate if each person spoke a unique language, or how hard it would be to pay a bill if every individual used a different numbering system. Continue reading

Creating Organizational Excellence – Part Four

This post is the fourth in a five-part series on organizational excellence, which comprises five elements. The first three, discussed in previous posts, include process management, project management and change management.

We live in a knowledge-based economy. Most organizations’ value is defined by their intellectual capital rather than their physical assets. “The fundamental building material of a modern corporation is knowledge,” says Hewlett-Packard’s Valery Kanavsky. All organizations have it, but most don’t know what they know, don’t use what they do know and don’t reuse the knowledge they have. In today’s economy, knowledge is power, and power brings success. Failure, survival or success depends upon the way an organization uses its knowledge. Continue reading

Thirteen Fundamental Truths

Back in 1986 I documented a list of 13 fundamental truths that applied to all organizations. I ran across these statements recently when I was looking for some comments made by a past IBM president that I wanted to use in a new book I am writing. As I thought back over the past 25 years, I realized that Continue reading

Uneasy But Useful Allies

There’s so much information in the world today that letting people re-create their own databases is a luxury we can’t afford. If we were all allowed to create our own basic concepts without any standardization, we couldn’t effectively interact with each other. Imagine trying to communicate if each person spoke a unique language, or how hard it would be to pay a bill if every individual used a different numbering system. Continue reading

Creating Organizational Excellence – Part Four

This post is the fourth in a five-part series on organizational excellence, which comprises five elements. The first three, discussed in previous posts, include process management, project management and change management.

We live in a knowledge-based economy. Most organizations’ value is defined by their intellectual capital rather than their physical assets. “The fundamental building material of a modern corporation is knowledge,” says Hewlett-Packard’s Valery Kanavsky. All organizations have it, but most don’t know what they know, don’t use what they do know and don’t reuse the knowledge they have. In today’s economy, knowledge is power, and power brings success. Failure, survival or success depends upon the way an organization uses its knowledge. Continue reading